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Kathy Clark  "Dragsúgur"

Kathy Clark "Dragsúgur"

Dragsúgur

( Icelandic for the cold coming in from the window)

He becomes the window gallery´s alter ego and transforms into a mobile gallery to take his own journey to have a human experience.

Dragsúgur, the window gallery that began to wander.

As an embodiment of Wind and Weather Window Gallery, Dragsúgur (the Icelandic name for the wind that comes in from a window) will travel amongst different locations in Reykjavik during the Reykjavik Arts Festival 2018. The window is actually taking its journey home, meaning, home doesn’t always have to be where your origins are but can be a place you find after a long journey. On Dragsúgur’s journey, he comes across a variety of characters that take part in the story of his journey home.

Like the building that houses the window gallery, which was built in 1913, Dragsúgur shares memories with the building. They share the same origins from a time when Iceland was a vastly different place than it is now. He has been transformed through his longing to experience walking in human form into a mobile gallery. Dragsúgur, in his travels, holds a space for artists to perform and place installations, and in this way, he comes to understand even more the embodied experience of human consciousness.

The window as a man as well as a window into man.

If a human is to embody a house, he/she must walk with it and feel as the house would feel flesh. How can a structure not fall in love with the landscape in which it rests and long to see what the slants of pavements and rolling coasts feel like underfoot? One hundred years is a long time to be stationary, gazing, calculating, and musing on the surroundings as Dragsúgur did before he became Dragsúgur:


“I have returned to my first love, the landscape, this vast and eternal space that tells me on the wind that I am understood even without my container as I spill out into a body – complete unconditional acceptance, containing me in my growing without architecture. Now I am learning to walk in the land I fell in love with from my stationary position for almost one hundred years. I have been gazing - before the camera, before the poetry, before the painting, before the vase, before the songs, before the film – landscape carried me even then in my arriving and departing. This landscape is the cityscape in the way that everything that was before will come again – the ghosts of culture rest in landscape. Now, in the early years of this century, the landscape is a ruin and a precipice, a construction and a screen.”

Can a nomadic window traveling home find home wherever it rests? Always changing with each experience, the window is not a fixed base, but an embodiment of home. As the window itself looks out, the viewer in turn gazes in. The window then comes to be an embodiment of the viewer as well.

Text written by Erin Honeycutt. Photo by Sveinni Speight, Sculpture/ photograph by in window by Claudia Hausfeld.

Exhibiting inside, The Espresso Bar, an installation and performance piece by Egill Sæbjörnsson and Ívar Glói.

Second exhibition, The Night Station, an installation by Styrmir Örn Guðmundsson and Agata Mickiewicz.

Exact replica of the window gallery made of wood, glass and paint.

Kathy Clark

Kathy Clark

Dragsúgur.


”My name is Dragsúgur, or, as it is known in the language spoken here, the wind that comes in under the windowsill. I am a window gallery found on Hverfisgata and have been part of the architecture there for one hundred years. Now, by some unknown force to me, I will take a walk and discover this city through its artists. Long have I contemplated what goes on outside my window, for it is my window to the world.”

Exact replica of the window gallery made of wood, glass and paint.



Kathy Clark  "Dragsúgur"

Kathy Clark "Dragsúgur"

Dragsúgur, the mobile window.

Detail of back section with text.

Exact replica of the window gallery made of wood, glass and paint.

IMG_1231.jpg
Egill Sæbjörnsson and Ívar Glói

Egill Sæbjörnsson and Ívar Glói

The Espresso Bar.

Street view with artist Ívar Glói and barista inside the bar.

The Espresso Bar

The Espresso Bar

A performance installation by Egill Sæbjörnsson and Ívar Glói- May 26 - June 2 June at Hverfisgata 37, and June 3 - June 8 at Austurvöllur . The Espresso Bar is both a political work commenting on how boring it is to live in a world where simple things like a cup of coffee cost a fortune in large cities around the world and It’s a study on how to make and operate an espresso bar. Setting the price of each espresso to 100KR it will, by, far, be the cheapest place in all of Icealnd for two weeks, The bar will also host a selection of artworks made especially for the project, with the bar setting the stage for those pieces, ívar Gloí and Egill both share the fascination about storefronts and the general idea of how things are staged” in human society.

Egill Sæbjörnsson and Ívar Glói

Egill Sæbjörnsson and Ívar Glói

The Espresso Bar.

Detail view inside of the artists and a coffee customer.

Egill Sæbjörnsson and Ívar Glói

Egill Sæbjörnsson and Ívar Glói

The Espresso Bar

Sidewalk view.

Kathy Clark

Kathy Clark

Dragsúgur

Moving on to the next destination with the aid of Þórir and his lift.

Exact replica of the window gallery made of wood, glass and paint.

Kathy Clark

Kathy Clark

Dragsúgur

Touches gently down at Austurvöllur, the park at the Parliament House, in Reykjavík. Here he takes part with the art installation and performance piece, The Espresso Bar, Egill Sæbjörnsson and Ívar Glói.

Egill Sæbjörnsson and Ívar Glói

Egill Sæbjörnsson and Ívar Glói

The Espresso Bar.

View inside with barista Finnur at Austurvöllur. Reykjavík.

Egill Sæbjörnsson and Ívar Glói

Egill Sæbjörnsson and Ívar Glói

The Espresso Bar.

View from the park Austurvöllur. Reykjavík.

Egill Sæbjörnsson and Ívar Glói

Egill Sæbjörnsson and Ívar Glói

The Espresso Bar.

View from the park Austurvöllur, Reykjavík.

Egill Sæbjörnsson and ívar Glói

Egill Sæbjörnsson and ívar Glói

The Espresso Bar.

Installation/Performance work inside Dragsúgur.

May 22- June 9, 2018

Egill Sæbjörnsson (b. 1973) is an Icelandic artist residing in Berlin. His works often consist of combinations of real objects, the illusion and magic of projected video images, sound performance and he is also known for his music. Sæbjörnsson is witty, ingenious and deep, all in one. He makes us confused and surprised and leads us to pose ontological questions, doing so in a way that both he and we enjoy. Sæbjörnsson’s works are of an experiential nature, requiring neither instructions nor education in order to be understood. In 2017 Egill Sæbjörnsson represented Iceland at the Biennale Arte 2017 in Venice, where he let two imaginary friends—the 36-meter tall, people-eating trolls—Ugh & Boogar, take over the exhibition concept. He is represented by i8 Gallery in Iceland and Hopstreet Gallery in Brussels.

Ívar Glói’s (b. 1992) works deal with the context of the art installation and the idea of the unique art object in an age marked by virtual connectedness. Using different media to project hints of different places into each exhibition space. The works play with the notion of the viewer being somewhere unique, however staged the setting of it may be. Ívar Glói has studied in the Iceland Academy of Arts, where he finished his BA in Fine Arts in 2014, Hochschule für Bildende Künste in Hamburg and Konsthögskolan i Malmö. Recent projects include Round and round; north, east, south, west on repeat at Delfi, Malmö, Floating, hanging, cloudy, lit up floor plans & Ikea Snapshots at Bismút, Reykjavík and the release of his 7-inch vinyl record ‘Into the Groove’.

Egill Sæbjörnsson and Ívar Glói

Egill Sæbjörnsson and Ívar Glói

The Espresso Bar.

Only 100 ISK.

The Night Station June 10-24, 2018

The Night Station June 10-24, 2018

By Styrmir Örn Guðmundsson and Agata Mickiewicz June 10- 24

At the beginning of a new moon calendar on 14th June, 2018, during Icelandic white bright nights, Agata and Styrmir propose to inhabit the Window Gallery with the project, The Night Station. The artists will have stitched and embroidered a large picture of the moon which encompasses the entire window. In addition to the moon a sentence is spelled out with small ceramic letter tiles. These poetic subtitles will make reference to literature, poetry and philosophy about the missing dark night during the bright summer sky. On a few occasions during the two weeks guest artists will be invited to contribute to the installation with night- specific performances, readings, music and interventions.

 Styrmir Örn Guðmundsson and Agata Mickiewicz

Styrmir Örn Guðmundsson and Agata Mickiewicz

The Night Station.

Embroidery and fabric with Icelandic wool.

Dragsúgur at Hallgrimskirkja, June 10-14, 2018. Reykjavík.

 Styrmir Örn Guðmundsson and Agata Mickiewicz

Styrmir Örn Guðmundsson and Agata Mickiewicz

The Night Station.

Dragsúgur´s location at Hallgrimskirkja, June 10- 14, 2018. Reykjavík.

 Styrmir Örn Guðmundsson and Agata Mickiewicz

Styrmir Örn Guðmundsson and Agata Mickiewicz

The Night Station.

Dragsúgur is on the move to another location at Bernhöftstorfan, Reykjavík.

 Styrmir Örn Guðmundsson and Agata Mickiewicz

Styrmir Örn Guðmundsson and Agata Mickiewicz

The Night Station.

Dragsúgur touches down at Bernhöftstorfan June 14-22, 2018. Reykjavík.

 Styrmir Örn Guðmundsson and Agata Mickiewicz

Styrmir Örn Guðmundsson and Agata Mickiewicz

The Night Station.

Dragsúgur´s rests here at Bernhöftstorfan, June 14 -21, 2018. Reykjavík.

Erin Honeycutt, as "The Chronicler".

Erin Honeycutt, as "The Chronicler".

Windows Open.

A Performance as Dragsúgur´s, “The Chronicler,” by Erin Honeycutt,

and collaboration with Kathy Clark.

The Night Station, pictured here, by Styrmir Örn Guðmundsson and Agata Mickiewicz.

Erin Honeycutt, as "The Chronicler".

Erin Honeycutt, as "The Chronicler".

Windows Open.

A Performance as Dragsúgur´s, “The Chronicler,” by Erin Honeycutt,

and collaboration with Kathy Clark.

Erin Honeycutt as "The Chronicler".

Erin Honeycutt as "The Chronicler".

Windows Open.

A Performance as Dragsúgur´s, “The Chronicler,” by Erin Honeycutt,

and collaboration with Kathy Clark.

The Night Station, pictured here, by Styrmir Örn Guðmundsson and Agata Mickiewicz.

Arnar Ásgeirsson and Styrmir Örn Guðmundsson

Arnar Ásgeirsson and Styrmir Örn Guðmundsson

Close Encounters.

Performance by Arnar Ásgeirsson and Styrmir Örn Guðmundsson at Bernhöftstorfan, Reykjavík.

Arnar Ásgeirsson and Styrmir Örn Guðmundsson

Arnar Ásgeirsson and Styrmir Örn Guðmundsson

Close Encounters.

Performance by Arnar Ásgeirsson and Styrmir Örn Guðmundsson at Bernhöftstorfan, Reykjavík.

Emilija Škarnulyté

Emilija Škarnulyté

Cloud Chamber.

Performance inside Dragsúgur and The Night Station by Styrmir Örn Guðmundsson and Agata Mickiewicz at Berhöftstorfan, Reykjavik.

Emilija Škarnulyté

Emilija Škarnulyté

Cloud Chamber.

Performance inside Dragsúgur and The Night Station by Styrmir Örn Guðmundsson and Agata Mickiewicz at Berhöftstorfan, Reykjavik.

Emilija Škarnulyté

Emilija Škarnulyté

Cloud Chamber.

Performance inside Dragsúgur and The Night Station by Styrmir Örn Guðmundsson and Agata Mickiewicz at Berhöftstorfan, Reykjavik.

 Styrmir Örn Guðmundsson and Agata Mickiewicz

Styrmir Örn Guðmundsson and Agata Mickiewicz

The Night Station.

Dragsúgur´s on the move from Bernhöftstorfan back “home” to Hverfisgata 37, Reykjavík.

Styrmir Örn Guðmundsson and Agata Mickiewicz

Styrmir Örn Guðmundsson and Agata Mickiewicz

The Night Station.

Dragsúgur´s “home coming” at Hverfisgata 37, Reykjavík.

Erin Honeycutt as "The Chronicler"

Erin Honeycutt as "The Chronicler"

Dragsúgur´s, “The Chronicler”.

Pictured inside Dragsúgur, is “The Night Station” by Styrmir Örn Guðmundsson and Agata Mickiewicz.

Icelandic wool, fabric, and string.

_DSC3780.JPG
_DSC3980.jpg

Kathy Clark "Dragsúgur"

Dragsúgur

( Icelandic for the cold coming in from the window)

He becomes the window gallery´s alter ego and transforms into a mobile gallery to take his own journey to have a human experience.

Dragsúgur, the window gallery that began to wander.

As an embodiment of Wind and Weather Window Gallery, Dragsúgur (the Icelandic name for the wind that comes in from a window) will travel amongst different locations in Reykjavik during the Reykjavik Arts Festival 2018. The window is actually taking its journey home, meaning, home doesn’t always have to be where your origins are but can be a place you find after a long journey. On Dragsúgur’s journey, he comes across a variety of characters that take part in the story of his journey home.

Like the building that houses the window gallery, which was built in 1913, Dragsúgur shares memories with the building. They share the same origins from a time when Iceland was a vastly different place than it is now. He has been transformed through his longing to experience walking in human form into a mobile gallery. Dragsúgur, in his travels, holds a space for artists to perform and place installations, and in this way, he comes to understand even more the embodied experience of human consciousness.

The window as a man as well as a window into man.

If a human is to embody a house, he/she must walk with it and feel as the house would feel flesh. How can a structure not fall in love with the landscape in which it rests and long to see what the slants of pavements and rolling coasts feel like underfoot? One hundred years is a long time to be stationary, gazing, calculating, and musing on the surroundings as Dragsúgur did before he became Dragsúgur:


“I have returned to my first love, the landscape, this vast and eternal space that tells me on the wind that I am understood even without my container as I spill out into a body – complete unconditional acceptance, containing me in my growing without architecture. Now I am learning to walk in the land I fell in love with from my stationary position for almost one hundred years. I have been gazing - before the camera, before the poetry, before the painting, before the vase, before the songs, before the film – landscape carried me even then in my arriving and departing. This landscape is the cityscape in the way that everything that was before will come again – the ghosts of culture rest in landscape. Now, in the early years of this century, the landscape is a ruin and a precipice, a construction and a screen.”

Can a nomadic window traveling home find home wherever it rests? Always changing with each experience, the window is not a fixed base, but an embodiment of home. As the window itself looks out, the viewer in turn gazes in. The window then comes to be an embodiment of the viewer as well.

Text written by Erin Honeycutt. Photo by Sveinni Speight, Sculpture/ photograph by in window by Claudia Hausfeld.

Exhibiting inside, The Espresso Bar, an installation and performance piece by Egill Sæbjörnsson and Ívar Glói.

Second exhibition, The Night Station, an installation by Styrmir Örn Guðmundsson and Agata Mickiewicz.

Exact replica of the window gallery made of wood, glass and paint.

Kathy Clark

Dragsúgur.


”My name is Dragsúgur, or, as it is known in the language spoken here, the wind that comes in under the windowsill. I am a window gallery found on Hverfisgata and have been part of the architecture there for one hundred years. Now, by some unknown force to me, I will take a walk and discover this city through its artists. Long have I contemplated what goes on outside my window, for it is my window to the world.”

Exact replica of the window gallery made of wood, glass and paint.



Kathy Clark "Dragsúgur"

Dragsúgur, the mobile window.

Detail of back section with text.

Exact replica of the window gallery made of wood, glass and paint.

Egill Sæbjörnsson and Ívar Glói

The Espresso Bar.

Street view with artist Ívar Glói and barista inside the bar.

The Espresso Bar

A performance installation by Egill Sæbjörnsson and Ívar Glói- May 26 - June 2 June at Hverfisgata 37, and June 3 - June 8 at Austurvöllur . The Espresso Bar is both a political work commenting on how boring it is to live in a world where simple things like a cup of coffee cost a fortune in large cities around the world and It’s a study on how to make and operate an espresso bar. Setting the price of each espresso to 100KR it will, by, far, be the cheapest place in all of Icealnd for two weeks, The bar will also host a selection of artworks made especially for the project, with the bar setting the stage for those pieces, ívar Gloí and Egill both share the fascination about storefronts and the general idea of how things are staged” in human society.

Egill Sæbjörnsson and Ívar Glói

The Espresso Bar.

Detail view inside of the artists and a coffee customer.

Egill Sæbjörnsson and Ívar Glói

The Espresso Bar

Sidewalk view.

Kathy Clark

Dragsúgur

Moving on to the next destination with the aid of Þórir and his lift.

Exact replica of the window gallery made of wood, glass and paint.

Kathy Clark

Dragsúgur

Touches gently down at Austurvöllur, the park at the Parliament House, in Reykjavík. Here he takes part with the art installation and performance piece, The Espresso Bar, Egill Sæbjörnsson and Ívar Glói.

Egill Sæbjörnsson and Ívar Glói

The Espresso Bar.

View inside with barista Finnur at Austurvöllur. Reykjavík.

Egill Sæbjörnsson and Ívar Glói

The Espresso Bar.

View from the park Austurvöllur. Reykjavík.

Egill Sæbjörnsson and Ívar Glói

The Espresso Bar.

View from the park Austurvöllur, Reykjavík.

Egill Sæbjörnsson and ívar Glói

The Espresso Bar.

Installation/Performance work inside Dragsúgur.

May 22- June 9, 2018

Egill Sæbjörnsson (b. 1973) is an Icelandic artist residing in Berlin. His works often consist of combinations of real objects, the illusion and magic of projected video images, sound performance and he is also known for his music. Sæbjörnsson is witty, ingenious and deep, all in one. He makes us confused and surprised and leads us to pose ontological questions, doing so in a way that both he and we enjoy. Sæbjörnsson’s works are of an experiential nature, requiring neither instructions nor education in order to be understood. In 2017 Egill Sæbjörnsson represented Iceland at the Biennale Arte 2017 in Venice, where he let two imaginary friends—the 36-meter tall, people-eating trolls—Ugh & Boogar, take over the exhibition concept. He is represented by i8 Gallery in Iceland and Hopstreet Gallery in Brussels.

Ívar Glói’s (b. 1992) works deal with the context of the art installation and the idea of the unique art object in an age marked by virtual connectedness. Using different media to project hints of different places into each exhibition space. The works play with the notion of the viewer being somewhere unique, however staged the setting of it may be. Ívar Glói has studied in the Iceland Academy of Arts, where he finished his BA in Fine Arts in 2014, Hochschule für Bildende Künste in Hamburg and Konsthögskolan i Malmö. Recent projects include Round and round; north, east, south, west on repeat at Delfi, Malmö, Floating, hanging, cloudy, lit up floor plans & Ikea Snapshots at Bismút, Reykjavík and the release of his 7-inch vinyl record ‘Into the Groove’.

Egill Sæbjörnsson and Ívar Glói

The Espresso Bar.

Only 100 ISK.

The Night Station June 10-24, 2018

By Styrmir Örn Guðmundsson and Agata Mickiewicz June 10- 24

At the beginning of a new moon calendar on 14th June, 2018, during Icelandic white bright nights, Agata and Styrmir propose to inhabit the Window Gallery with the project, The Night Station. The artists will have stitched and embroidered a large picture of the moon which encompasses the entire window. In addition to the moon a sentence is spelled out with small ceramic letter tiles. These poetic subtitles will make reference to literature, poetry and philosophy about the missing dark night during the bright summer sky. On a few occasions during the two weeks guest artists will be invited to contribute to the installation with night- specific performances, readings, music and interventions.

Styrmir Örn Guðmundsson and Agata Mickiewicz

The Night Station.

Embroidery and fabric with Icelandic wool.

Dragsúgur at Hallgrimskirkja, June 10-14, 2018. Reykjavík.

Styrmir Örn Guðmundsson and Agata Mickiewicz

The Night Station.

Dragsúgur´s location at Hallgrimskirkja, June 10- 14, 2018. Reykjavík.

Styrmir Örn Guðmundsson and Agata Mickiewicz

The Night Station.

Dragsúgur is on the move to another location at Bernhöftstorfan, Reykjavík.

Styrmir Örn Guðmundsson and Agata Mickiewicz

The Night Station.

Dragsúgur touches down at Bernhöftstorfan June 14-22, 2018. Reykjavík.

Styrmir Örn Guðmundsson and Agata Mickiewicz

The Night Station.

Dragsúgur´s rests here at Bernhöftstorfan, June 14 -21, 2018. Reykjavík.

Erin Honeycutt, as "The Chronicler".

Windows Open.

A Performance as Dragsúgur´s, “The Chronicler,” by Erin Honeycutt,

and collaboration with Kathy Clark.

The Night Station, pictured here, by Styrmir Örn Guðmundsson and Agata Mickiewicz.

Erin Honeycutt, as "The Chronicler".

Windows Open.

A Performance as Dragsúgur´s, “The Chronicler,” by Erin Honeycutt,

and collaboration with Kathy Clark.

Erin Honeycutt as "The Chronicler".

Windows Open.

A Performance as Dragsúgur´s, “The Chronicler,” by Erin Honeycutt,

and collaboration with Kathy Clark.

The Night Station, pictured here, by Styrmir Örn Guðmundsson and Agata Mickiewicz.

Arnar Ásgeirsson and Styrmir Örn Guðmundsson

Close Encounters.

Performance by Arnar Ásgeirsson and Styrmir Örn Guðmundsson at Bernhöftstorfan, Reykjavík.

Arnar Ásgeirsson and Styrmir Örn Guðmundsson

Close Encounters.

Performance by Arnar Ásgeirsson and Styrmir Örn Guðmundsson at Bernhöftstorfan, Reykjavík.

Emilija Škarnulyté

Cloud Chamber.

Performance inside Dragsúgur and The Night Station by Styrmir Örn Guðmundsson and Agata Mickiewicz at Berhöftstorfan, Reykjavik.

Emilija Škarnulyté

Cloud Chamber.

Performance inside Dragsúgur and The Night Station by Styrmir Örn Guðmundsson and Agata Mickiewicz at Berhöftstorfan, Reykjavik.

Emilija Škarnulyté

Cloud Chamber.

Performance inside Dragsúgur and The Night Station by Styrmir Örn Guðmundsson and Agata Mickiewicz at Berhöftstorfan, Reykjavik.

Styrmir Örn Guðmundsson and Agata Mickiewicz

The Night Station.

Dragsúgur´s on the move from Bernhöftstorfan back “home” to Hverfisgata 37, Reykjavík.

Styrmir Örn Guðmundsson and Agata Mickiewicz

The Night Station.

Dragsúgur´s “home coming” at Hverfisgata 37, Reykjavík.

Erin Honeycutt as "The Chronicler"

Dragsúgur´s, “The Chronicler”.

Pictured inside Dragsúgur, is “The Night Station” by Styrmir Örn Guðmundsson and Agata Mickiewicz.

Icelandic wool, fabric, and string.

Kathy Clark  "Dragsúgur"
Kathy Clark
Kathy Clark  "Dragsúgur"
IMG_1231.jpg
Egill Sæbjörnsson and Ívar Glói
The Espresso Bar
Egill Sæbjörnsson and Ívar Glói
Egill Sæbjörnsson and Ívar Glói
Kathy Clark
Kathy Clark
Egill Sæbjörnsson and Ívar Glói
Egill Sæbjörnsson and Ívar Glói
Egill Sæbjörnsson and Ívar Glói
Egill Sæbjörnsson and ívar Glói
Egill Sæbjörnsson and Ívar Glói
The Night Station June 10-24, 2018
 Styrmir Örn Guðmundsson and Agata Mickiewicz
 Styrmir Örn Guðmundsson and Agata Mickiewicz
 Styrmir Örn Guðmundsson and Agata Mickiewicz
 Styrmir Örn Guðmundsson and Agata Mickiewicz
 Styrmir Örn Guðmundsson and Agata Mickiewicz
Erin Honeycutt, as "The Chronicler".
Erin Honeycutt, as "The Chronicler".
Erin Honeycutt as "The Chronicler".
Arnar Ásgeirsson and Styrmir Örn Guðmundsson
Arnar Ásgeirsson and Styrmir Örn Guðmundsson
Emilija Škarnulyté
Emilija Škarnulyté
Emilija Škarnulyté
 Styrmir Örn Guðmundsson and Agata Mickiewicz
Styrmir Örn Guðmundsson and Agata Mickiewicz
Erin Honeycutt as "The Chronicler"
_DSC3780.JPG
_DSC3980.jpg